WFE-cover.png

Waiting for Eldridge

"With a sound that blends americana, rock and folk that bring up similarities of Tom Petty, Messier is a hurricane force of music that he humbly self-describes as 'just rock n’ roll'. Bringing together keyboard parts, trumpet playing, and sonically charged guitar grooves that intertwine effortlessly with his lyrics, Messier masters multiple sounds and moods, from deep, intimate ballads, to switching and rocking your face off.” -

-Andrew Conroy KUTX

david90.jpg

David Messier

  • Expectations might run high, if, for example, you released your first solo album after an 8-year hiatus from putting out your own music. Perhaps after spending 6 years fronting the Boston-based band Papermoon, it made sense to take a little bit of time to figure out how to present yourself as a solo artist. But 8 years? Singer/Songwriter David Messier has an answer for that: “I've been doing this for 16 years, and I’ve put a lot of work in. I'm more at this point in my career where I'm okay with what happens next, so that is the attitude I have. If it took 8 years for me to get this album out, I'm okay with it. “ The result, Waiting for Eldridge, is more than worth the wait, with Austin’s KUTX Radio saying, “Bringing together keyboard parts, trumpet playing, and sonically charged guitar grooves that intertwine effortlessly with his lyrics, Messier masters multiple sounds and moods, from deep, intimate ballads, to switching and rocking your face off.”

    Multi-instrumentalist David Messier was born on the South Shore of Massachusetts into a family that placed a high value on imagination and originality. He was always drawn to creativity, literally, and began writing music in the third grade. Even if he didn’t really understand why, he found himself singing along to songs on the radio, “whatever pop music was about heartache,” and had a compulsion to drum on whatever was around the house. His parents wisely got him a drum set, and he began lessons in Junior High. Fortuitously, David’s dad had once done sound for concerts. “The basement of our house was a kind of a graveyard for all of this equipment he used. So as soon as I started playing the drums, I started recording to tape machines and messing with that. That led me to songwriting and singing to the drums, to guitar, to the piano.” When he was 15, David started his first band, Driftwood. They immediately started writing their own material. The songwriting muscle was exercised once more.

    After Driftwood Messier started another band called Papermoon. Papermoon put out 3 albums during their six years together, and had a strong fan following in the NorthEast of the US. Their hybrid of alt-country and pop grabbed a lot of positive attention, eventually presenting them with the opportunity to work with producer/engineer Paul Santo (Ringo Starr/Aerosmith) on their 2007 album “The Greenhouse Effect.” After touring behind the “jangly, jaunty” record, Papermoon broke up.

    Citing a bit of “band burnout,” David started to produce records and run his own recording studio, working with artists such as This Blue Heaven, Brendan Kelly, Gina Chavez, Patrick Husband, Lacy Rose, Dave Madden and Jen Zava, whose forthcoming album, “Power to Change,” has a big buzz brewing. After awhile, it was time for David to return to his first love, songwriting. The result is “Waiting for Eldridge,” produced by friend and collaborator Eldridge Goins. If you took a dash of Tom Petty, a sprinkle of Lou Reed and pinch of Leonard Cohen, mixed it in a pot with some alt country, pop and rock, you’d have a hell of an album. Sharp lyrics, harmony-shaking songs and sing-a-long melodies throughout, “Waiting For Eldridge” was a solo labor of love. “The nice thing about starting this record with Eldridge was that there was no band,” says Messier, “I didn't have any body to consider, or any opinions to think about; I gave Eldridge a hammer and said, ‘you are in charge, let’s make a record.’ “

    Messier’s perspective is unique – he sits on both sides of the table: A producer, Studio owner, President of the Texas Grammy Chapter as well as a recording artist who bleeds for his art. He loves what he does and sharing that joy with people. “I think what makes me unique as a performer is that I’m not afraid. I like looking right at people when I'm playing and challenge them to listen. As a writer, I really try to tell the truth. Personally, I’m on a search for what is true about me, what’s true about my feelings, I'm a student of myself, I'm a student of life. I'd rather talk about the real human experience.”